Thursday, March 15, 2007

Animal-like Protists


Students working on the animal-like protists can post here!

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

hey peeps! felt like commenting :]

well anyways i will start researching things soon so that our podcast as in me and vikkitor's BEASTS!!!! cchhhhyyyeahh


anna banana :]

Anonymous said...

♥ :]


anna banana

Anonymous said...

come on guys ; comment !



Anna Banana

victoria said...

why id u tell me to come on

Anonymous said...

what do we have to do i dont get what we have to do

vickii tor said...

??

Anonymous said...

oh ; we have to start looking up information


anna banana

♥ Anna Banana said...

=] animal protists

anna banana said...

For this podcast, your group must

1. Identify the characteristics of your Protist group.

2. Identify and briefly describe the different types of Protists in your group.

3. Explain the different ways the Protists in your group move.

4. Explain how the Protists in your group affect other organisms.

5. Predict what the world would be like without the Protist group you have been assigned.

anna banana said...

those questions dudes and dudettes

Anna-banana said...

heyy yal

annabanana/vickiitor said...

Protists (IPA: /ˈprəʊ.tɪst/ (RP); /ˈproʊ.tɪst/ (GenAm)), Greek protiston -a meaning the (most) first of all ones, are a diverse group of organisms, comprising those eukaryotes that are not animals or plants. They are usually treated as the kingdom Protista or Protoctista. The protists are a paraphyletic grade, rather than a natural (monophyletic) group, and do not have much in common besides a relatively simple organization (unicellular, or multicellular without highly specialized tissues). Essentially, the Kingdom Protoctista is made up of organisms which cannot be classified into any other kingdom.

Protists were traditionally subdivided into several groups based on similarities to the higher kingdoms: the animal-like protozoa, the plant-like algae, and the fungus-like slime moulds and water moulds. These groups often overlap, and have been replaced by phylogenetic classifications. However, they are still useful as informal groups for describing the morphology and ecology of protists.

At one time, bacteria were also considered protists, under the three-kingdom system of Animalia (corresponding closely to the modern kingdom), Plantae (which included Fungi as well as plants), and Protista (everything else). See kingdom (biology)

annabanana/vickiitor said...

http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/ProtistsI.htm



good website :]

annabanana said...

GET WORKiNG GUYS!

> due tomorrow :]

anna banana / vickiitor said...

http://www.lanesville.k12.in.us/lcsyellowpages/Tickit/Carl/protists.html



good website for #1 & #2 :]


annabanana and vickiitor

anna said...

for number 1

http://www.sirinet.net/~jgjohnso/protista.html

vickii tor ♥ said...

what did u get so far

anna said...

so how do you want to start the script?

anna said...

we can say like

hello, this garage band production was made by anna and victoria

OTHER GROUPS DONT COPY!!!!!!!!!!!

anna said...

he Kingdom Protista contains both unicellular and multicellular organisms. The majority are microscopic. The kingdom can be separated into three major categories: animal-like (protozoa), plant-like (algae), and fungus-like organisms (slime molds, etc.). They live in aquatic habitats and most eat bacteria, other small organisms, or particles they find in the water. The algae, however, are autotrophs.

This activity allows students to design and carry out an experiment related to the Kingdom Protista. It is intended to encourage as much student-driven learning as possible about this fascinating kingdom. Initially, students will observe several protists under the microscope and attempt to examine and identify them. Then they will spend a day in the computer lab researching some questions about protists. Finally, they will use this information to develop a question and test hypotheses concerning the kingdom.

This project provides a fun and interesting way for students to learn about these tiny creatures. Protists are fascinating to watch under the microscope, and experimentation with them often requires few materials and little time. You will be amazed at the ideas students come up with for their projects!

Anonymous said...

hey y`all its anna banana . wow . i miss 7-6 soooo much <3 lol get back to reasearching animal like protists =]